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vintage-chicana:

Sylvia Mendez and her family won a class action lawsuit in 1946 against the Orange County School district that dismantled the segregated school system. This was eight years before the well-known Brown v. Board of Education case.

vintage-chicana:

Sylvia Mendez and her family won a class action lawsuit in 1946 against the Orange County School district that dismantled the segregated school system. This was eight years before the well-known Brown v. Board of Education case.

kaitlin-the-weirdo:


Mary Ann Shadd(1823–1893)
Shadd holds two titles: first female black lawyer and first female newspaper editor in North America. She was one of the first people to push for complete integration and opened the first school in Canada open to all races.

Source

kaitlin-the-weirdo:

Mary Ann Shadd
(1823–1893)

Shadd holds two titles: first female black lawyer and first female newspaper editor in North America. She was one of the first people to push for complete integration and opened the first school in Canada open to all races.

Source

africaisdonesuffering:

africaisdonesuffering :

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Why Brown Girls Need Brown Dolls”

There have long been debates regarding Disney’s lack of diversity and further, the lack of diversity in dolls for children of color. While reading an article on this subject matter, I came across a comment that made me raise…

sheenabeenaghana:

Well even in Ghana at the markets, if not used dolls, they sell new white dolls. Even in the new Shopright that opened up in Accra, the dolls they sell between the grocery isle are white. Come on, this is Ghana, where mostly everyone is a black - why is this little girl in the village walking around with a plastic white baby? And no wonder there are so many billboards posted along the roads for skin lighting. 

vintageblackglamour:

Eartha Kitt in 1948 as a Katherine Dunham dancer performing in Street scene, part of Motivos, choreographed by Ms. Dunham. Ms. Kitt began her illustrious career as a dancer with Ms. Dunham’s company after a serendipitous encounter outside of a theater. A pretty young woman walked up to her and asked her directions to Max Factor’s makeup shop. Ms. Kitt said, “But you are so pretty. Why would you want to wear makeup?” When the woman replied that she was sent to buy the makeup for Katherine Dunham, Ms. Kitt made a deal with her: “Tell me how to meet Katherine Dunham and I’ll give you directions to the makeup shop!” And the rest, of course, is history. Photo: Roger Wood, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

vintageblackglamour:

Eartha Kitt in 1948 as a Katherine Dunham dancer performing in Street scene, part of Motivos, choreographed by Ms. Dunham. Ms. Kitt began her illustrious career as a dancer with Ms. Dunham’s company after a serendipitous encounter outside of a theater. A pretty young woman walked up to her and asked her directions to Max Factor’s makeup shop. Ms. Kitt said, “But you are so pretty. Why would you want to wear makeup?” When the woman replied that she was sent to buy the makeup for Katherine Dunham, Ms. Kitt made a deal with her: “Tell me how to meet Katherine Dunham and I’ll give you directions to the makeup shop!” And the rest, of course, is history. Photo: Roger Wood, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

When people of colour are expected to educate white people as to their humanity, when women are expected to educate men, lesbians and gay men are expected to educate the heterosexual world, the oppressors maintain their position and evade their responsibility for their own actions.
Audre Lorde (via femme-fatale-feminista)